Welcome to the Funk Lab

We strive to understand the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain biological diversity using population genomics, experimental manipulations, and field studies. Our goal is to not only test basic ecological and evolutionary theory, but also directly inform policy and management decisions that will ultimately determine the fate of biodiversity.

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Sarah Fitzpatrick’s paper on the genomic and fitness consequences of genetic rescue published in Current Biology!

Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) (Photo: Chris Funk)

Although gene flow may limit adaptation, it can also rescue small, inbred populations. Sarah Fitzpatrick–former Funk lab PhD student and current Assistant Professor at Michigan State University–led our paper just out in Current Biology documenting genetic rescue in wild populations of Trinidadian guppies. Combining wild […]

Paper accepted in Ecology Letters on the effects of extreme flood on stream insect persistence and evolution

N. LeRoy Poff and collaborators (including Patricia Salerno and W. Chris Funk from the Funk Lab) recently had a paper accepted in Ecology Letters on the effects of an extreme flood event on stream insect persistence and evolution. They found that persistence decreased with increasing disturbance and that species traits predicted resilience. For taxa […]

Funk lab undergrad–Jill Gerberich–awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship!

Jill Gerberich with leatherback sea turtle in Trinidad.

Congratulations to Jill Gerberich for being awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship!!! This is a very prestigious fellowship awarded to promising students to pursue a PhD. Jill has been an undergraduate researcher in the Funk lab for four years helping former PhD student Sarah […]