Welcome to the Funk Lab

We strive to understand the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain biological diversity using population genomics, experimental manipulations, and field studies. Our goal is to not only test basic ecological and evolutionary theory, but also directly inform policy and management decisions that will ultimately determine the fate of biodiversity.

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Sarah Fitzpatrick’s paper on the genomic and fitness consequences of genetic rescue published in Current Biology!

Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) (Photo: Chris Funk)

Although gene flow may limit adaptation, it can also rescue small, inbred populations. Sarah Fitzpatrick–former Funk lab PhD student and current Assistant Professor at Michigan State University–led our paper just out in Current Biology documenting genetic rescue in wild populations of Trinidadian guppies. Combining wild […]

Historic guppy transplant experiments in Trinidad provide a replicated test of the balance between selection and gene flow in nature, revealing that adaptive traits are maintained in the face of high gene flow

Sarah Fitzpatrick (PhD candidate), Lisa Angeloni (Associate Professor), Jill Gerberich (REU student), John Kronenberger (PhD student), and Chris Funk (Associate Professor) set out to the streams of Trinidad to investigate the impacts of previous transplant experiments where Trinidadian guppies were moved from stream localities with many predators into upstream tributaries with few predators. Guppies […]

Sarah, Lisa, and Chris give talk to high school students in Couva, Trinidad, about biodiversity, evolution, and conservation

Sarah explaining to high school students how evolutionary concepts can be applied to biodiversity conservation. On February 7th, Sarah Fitzpatrick, Lisa Angeloni, and Chris Funk gave a talk for high school students in Darlene Peters’ class at the Holy Faith Convent girl’s school about biodiversity, evolution, and conservation. In addition to talking about the […]