Welcome to the Funk Lab

We strive to understand the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms that generate and maintain biological diversity using population genomics, experimental manipulations, and field studies. Our goal is to not only test basic evolutionary and ecological theory, but also directly inform policy and management decisions that will ultimately determine the fate of biodiversity.

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Congratulations to Amanda Cicchino for winning a Graduate Research Excellence Grant – RC Lewontin Early Award from the Society for the Study of Evolution!

Adult coastal tailed frog (Ascaphus truei)

Amanda Cicchino was awarded a Graduate Student Excellence Grant – RC Lewontin Early Award from the Society for the Study of Evolution to test whether thermal tolerance changes throughout development in tailed frogs (Ascaphus spp.). Most studies on thermal tolerance focus on a single life history […]

Congratulations to Sarah Hays for winning third place for her poster at the Front Range Student Ecology Symposium and Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity Showcase!

Sarah Hays sharing her research results on nest construction in Santa Catalina Island Orange-crowned warblers.

Congratulations to Funkling Sarah Hays for getting third place for her poster at the Front Range Student Ecology Symposium and Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity Showcase! Sarah’s research was funded by the Research Mentoring to Advance Inclusivity […]

Congratulations to Amanda Cicchino for being awarded an NSERC Postgraduate Fellowship!

Amanda Cicchino and the world’s coolest frog, Ascaphus truei.

A huge congratulations to Amanda Cicchino for being awarded an NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) Postgraduate Fellowship-Doctoral (PGS-D). This is a highly competitive and prestigious fellowship which is similar to an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship in the U.S. Amanda […]

Funk Lab and colleagues receive NSF grant to fund tailed frog (Ascaphus) research!!! Yes!

Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus). Photo credit: Brenna Forester

We are elated to announce that NSF funded our “Rules of Life” EAGER grant entitled “Landscape Phenomics: Predicting vulnerability to climate change by linking environmental heterogeneity to genetic and phenotypic variation.” The overarching goal of our project is to predict which populations […]

Cameron Ghalambor, Scott Sillett, Brandt Ryder, Paul Hohenlohe, and Chris receive NSF grant to test mechanisms of microgeographic adaptation

Island scrub-jay (Aphelocoma insularis). Photo credit: Katie Langin

NSF has funded our collaborative research project aimed at understanding the mechanisms causing fine-scale adaptation in the face of ongoing gene flow in island scrub-jays. Growing evidence suggests that adaptive evolution can occur over small spatial distances. How this fine-scale adaptation arises and is […]

Alisha Shah awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Biology!!!

Alisha will likely be doing some of this during her postdoc in Missoula.

Alisha Shah has been awarded an NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Biology to work with Dr. Art Woods at the University of Montana, Missoula, on a project that investigates how microclimates on aspen trees affect the growth, survival, and […]

Congratulations to Maybellene Gamboa for receiving the Vice President for Research Fellowship!

The VPR fellowship is awarded to graduate students that conduct novel, interdisciplinary research at CSU and that exhibit an ability to communicate their work to a broad audience. Hundreds of CSU graduate students present their research at the annual CSU Graduate Student Showcase, and 40 presenters are selected to compete for a VPR Fellowship […]

Alisha wins the Ray Huey Award for Best Student Presentation at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting!!!

Alisha presented her DDIG work that addresses why mayfly species ranges are more restricted than we would predict based on thermal breadth alone. Alisha and her colleagues hypothesized that temperature acts synergistically with species interactions, such as predation, to restrict mayfly range expansion. They predicted that as mayflies move to warmer or cooler streams, […]

Eva Bacmeister wins 1st place for talk at Front Range Student Ecology Symposium!

Congratulations to undergrad Eva Bacmeister for winning 1st place for her talk at the 2017 Front Range Student Ecology Symposium held at CSU! Eva’s talk was based on her independent study of how temperature variability shapes the evolution of swimming performance (an important thermal tolerance trait) in temperate and tropical aquatic insects. Her work […]

Alisha Shah awarded an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant!!!

For her PhD work, Alisha has explored the effect of temperature in setting the range limits of temperate and tropical aquatic insects. So far, she has found that temperate insects that experience wide seasonal fluctuations in temperature typically have broader thermal breadths and can remain active over a wider range of temperatures. On the […]