Use Pangea to share large files with people outside of CSU?

By Ross Madden
Published on April 9, 2012 9:04 am MT
Updated on July 15, 2013 10:50 am MT
Posted in Knowledge Base, Pangea

The easiest way to share large files (something that cannot be e-mailed) is to simply post the files to a non-public web directory. Non-Public simply means that the directory is not linked to from any other public page. With this setup, you can post a file and send the URL to either the exact filename or just the non-public directory to your colleague.

First, connect to Pangea and go into the folder that corresponds to the web site you want to post your files on. If you want to do this in a personal web space, the folder you want is the public_html folder.  If you do not see a public_html folder, you can request one be set up by contacting CNSIT at the following URL: https://cnsit.natsci.colostate.edu/help.  Once in here, create a folder and give it a unique name, such as post, temp, or hg34uyt45. The folder name is totally arbitrary. Now, any files you place inside of this new folder will be available only to those who know the address (remember this is not to be linked to from any other public page).

For example, assuming my eID is rmmadden and I created a folder called post within my public_html folder. I am now going to place a file called foobar.txt within the post folder. Now, I want a colleague from outside of CSU to get the file foobar.txt – all I have to do is send them the following URL:

(exact filename for one file)
https://sites.biology.colostate.edu/rmmadden/post/foobar.txt

or

(the directory in the case where there are a lot of files to share)
https://sites.biology.colostate.edu/rmmadden/post/

Please Note: the URL shown above is for the sites.biology.colostate.edu domain used by the Biology department.  Please substitute this with the URL for your department by using the following domain names:

Biochemistry: sites.bmb.colostate.edu
Chemistry: sites.chem.colostate.edu
Biology: sites.biology.colostate.edu

They can then download the file(s) as needed without the use of FTP and without troubleshooting pesky firewall problems.

Now, suppose you have 100 (or any large number) files that are large and you need to share them with a colleague.  You will not want to send them 100 individual URLs for each file, and simply sending them the directory list will force them to click and download 100 files manually.  These easiest thing to do in this situation is to compress all 100 files into a single zip file and post that one file.  To create a zip file, place all of your files into a single directory on your local computer (not on Pangea yet), right-click (for Windows) or control-click (for Mac) and select the option for create a zip archive.  You now have a single zip file that contains all 100 files.

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