From Antarctica to U.S. grasslands: Wall lab in action

From Antarctica to U.S. grasslands: Wall lab in action

The Wall lab is once again in Antarctica for the austral summer field season. Professor Diana Wall, postdoc Walter Andriuzzi, and PhD student Ashley Shaw, together with colleagues from Dartmouth College, Virginia Tech and Brigham Young University, are currently in the McMurdo station, East Antarctica, the largest human facility on the continent. More details on the science, and frequent updates on the field work and the life in McMurdo, in “The World of Nematodes” blog. This year the team also includes a PolarTREC, Josh Heward, also covering the Wormherders’ feats in his blog.

Meanwhile, Dr. André Franco and lab manager Cecilia Tomasel keep pace with the preparation for the third year of our joint project with the Sala lab at Arizona State University examining which mechanisms govern the responses of primary productivity to water availability in grassland ecosystems. Besides resuming the multi-site field experiment on the growing season, the team will run a greenhouse experiment at CSU on spring 2017 aimed to study the sensitivity to water availability of soil-plant interactions. Find more about this NSF-funded project here.

The team in Garwood Valley.

The team in Garwood Valley, Antarctica.

 

Stained root-lesion nematode and its egg inside roots of Big bluestem grass.

Stained root-lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans) and its egg inside roots of Big bluestem grass.